Antoineonline.com : Boy in the striped pyjamas, the (9780552773805) : JOHN BOYNE : Books

My Shopping Bag

(0 Item)

You have just added :

    Other items :

    You have 0 more Item
    Total Price
    $ 0.00

    My Wishlist

    (0 Item)

    You have just added :

      Other items :

      You have 0 more Item
      Total Price
      $
      Antoine Online

      Boy In The Striped Pyjamas, The

      by JOHN BOYNE
      Our price: $10.63Unavailable
      *Contact us to request a special order. Price may vary.
      I Add to my wishlist
      |

      Product Details

      • Publisher: BLACK SWAN
      • Publishing date: 01/01/2007
      • Language: English
      • ISBN-13: 9780552773805
      • ISBN: 0552773808

      In just a few easy steps below, you can become an online reviewer.
      You'll be able to make changes before you submit your review.

      • Saw the movie first
        From Amazon

        My 10-year-old son and I watched the movie as he is studying WWII history. The end of the movie will surprise you. Moreover, you will be surprised by your own reaction.... You'll see. Now my son has purchased the book to see if it any different from the movie.

      • Great book & quick read
        From Amazon

        Book was well written and a quick read. Liked how the book was written from a little boy's perspective.

      • An engrossing introduction to the Holocaust for my 13yo daughter
        From Amazon

        This novel is one of my 13yo daughter's set readings in her Year 8 English studies. She asked me to read it so as I could assist her in her forthcoming essays surrounding the book. The story moves quickly and has many of the excesses and brutalities of the Holocaust either removed or simply not mentioned, and is strewn with factual inaccuracy. But while many other reviewers look upon these omissions and inaccuracies as detracting to the novel, remember this - the novel wasn't written for adults. I tried to look at the book through my daughter's eyes as I became engrossed on the story of young Bruno and his move from his lavish lifestyle in Berlin to a strange new place in the far flung reaches that he couldn't quite understand, the people he meets, both on his side of the fence and that of his new friend, Schmuel, and the shock ending that author Boyne places before us. The novel provokes many questions, as indeed I think it is meant to - all up an excellent choice in a curriculum at that year level.

      • Introduction to the Holocaust from child's point of view
        From Amazon

        This coming of age book demonstrates that the challenges of adolescence transcend into every culture and situation. Bruno is a self absorbed young boy who has to learn that his perception of the world and his family are not what he has been led to believe. He is the child of a Nazi leader of a concentration camp who is so lonely that he unwittingly becomes jealous of the community of Jewish prisoners he can see in their camp. He befriends a young boy "in striped pajamas" unaware that he is a starving prisoner facing death, believing until near the end that his loneliness is a worse situation. This beautifully written book shows the innocence and ignorance of youth and how unimaginable the reality of the Holocaust was. It is an appropriate introduction to the reality of the Holocaust for adolescents in Junior High and above. I highly recommend it for boys for whom Anne Frank may not be of interest due to the female perspecitve. Because of the difficult subject matter (children being killed) and the emotional impact on adolescents, I recommend reading along with your child. It would be an excellent selection for a monitored book club or to be taught in the classroom. The quality of writing is excellent. Although the theme is complex , the horror of the holocaust is revealed slowly as Bruno comes to realize what he is witnessing. The writing is simple enough that youunger children could read it, but probably shouldn't. I recommend following it up with Number the Stars, which ends on a much more positive note and shows the good side of humanity, as Jews are saved.

      • An Amazing Read!
        From Amazon

        The Boy in the Striped Pajamas was an amazing read for me. It was a fairly quick read. I think I finished it in two sittings but had to go back and reread the ending just for that final emotional punch. Although the Holocaust is an extremely serious topic, John Boyne has chosen to write an allegorical fable and I think this was an interesting and creative way to go, but the reader must be able to suspend his/her disbelief. Not a little, all of it. I think it is important for readers to know and understand the book is a fable and is written as such. The book is told from the point of view of 9 year old Bruno who is incredibly naïve and therefore does not understand his fathers position or the true purpose of "Out-With" (his name for Auschwitz.) I could spend hours pointing out historical inaccuracies or situations that are just plain impossible but again, this is a fable and historical accuracies are not the point of the book. The fable that makes this book serves a few purposes in my opinion. Firstly, the exaggerated naïveté of Bruno serves the purpose of implicitly letting us know the horrors that are occurring "off-page." This is nearly as terrorizing as actually reading about the atrocities because you KNOW exactly what is happening but it's not actually stated. Left to the imagination, these atrocities can be just as appalling or worse because no one is telling you what to see or feel. I felt this was a great psychological tool Boyne utilized throughout the book. Secondly, this fable serves to remind us that we will never, ever know what it is like to be that boy in the striped pajamas. Putting such a serious topic into such a naïve representation reminds me that I am naïve. I am like Bruno. I will never be able to completely or truly understand what went on for those in the striped pajamas. I like having this humbling reminder. I think this is the main point of the book. Only the victims and survivors truly know. I see this book as a tribute and a lesson. Another aspect of the book that I felt had some psychological pull was actually the turning of the pages. I know this sounds funny. I'm not spoiling anything by saying that the story is about a German boy who befriends a Jewish boy (who is in "striped pajamas") during the holocaust at Auschwitz. I KNEW from the start of the book it wasn't going to end well. I knew with each turn of the page that I was getting closer to a most-likely devastating ending, yet I had to keep reading. This book definitely touched me. Although told as a naïve fable to represent intense situations, I thought the book had lots of different layers to peel away. I am glad to have read it and I have recommended it to others.

      Close
      Working on your request