Antoineonline.com : Squares in Boston, Massachusetts: Franklin Place, Copley Square, Kenmore Square, Scollay Square, City Hall Plaza, Post Office Square, Boston (9781156869925) : : Books
  Login | Register En  |  Fr
Antoine Online

Squares In Boston, Massachusetts: Franklin Place, Copley Square, Kenmore Square, Scollay Square, City Hall Plaza, Post Office Square, Boston

Our price: LBP 21,200Unavailable
*Contact us to request a special order. Price may vary.
I Add to my wishlist
|

Product Details

  • Publisher: Books LLC
  • Publishing date: 20100915
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-13: 9781156869925
  • ISBN: 1156869927

Synopsis

Chapters: Franklin Place, Copley Square, Kenmore Square, Scollay Square, City Hall Plaza, Post Office Square, Boston, Massachusetts, Dewey Square, Haymarket Square, Louisburg Square, Maverick Square, Dudley Square, Central Square, East Boston, Day Square, Park Square, Washington Square. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 58. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Franklin Place, designed by Charles Bulfinch and built in Boston, Massachusetts in 1793-95, included a row of sixteen three-story brick townhouses that extended in a 480-foot curve, a small garden, and four double houses. Constructed early in Bulfinchs career, Franklin Place came after he had seen the possibilities of modern architecture in Europe and had determined to reshape his native city. It was the first important urban housing scheme undertaken in the United States, and the citys first row-house complex. However, years of decline and the push of industry into the area forced its demolition in 1858. Central pavilion, 1853. Side view. The garden. Bulfinch's elevation and plan for the Crescent. Bulfinch's drawing of the central pavilion.The name Tontine derives from a financial scheme originated by Neapolitan banker Lorenzo de Tonti, which he introduced in France in the 17th century. Money for the enterprise was to be raised by selling shares of stock to the members of the public, who would later share in the profits from the sale of the homes. It is essentially an annuity, the shares passing on the death of each beneficiary to the surviving partner until all are held by a single shareholder, or being divided among surviving stockholders at the end of a stated period. Although this method of financing was in rather wide use in Europe at the time, the Massachusetts General Court refused articles of incorporation and the proje...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=14410453

In just a few easy steps below, you can become an online reviewer.
You'll be able to make changes before you submit your review.

Close
Working on your request