Antoineonline.com : Prince caspian (rack): the return to narnia (chronicles of narnia (harpercollins paperback)) (9780064471053) : C. S. Lewis : Books

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      Prince Caspian (rack): The Return To Narnia (chronicles Of Narnia (harpercollins Paperback))

      by C. S. Lewis
      Our price: LBP 73,305 / $ 48.87Available
      *Estimated delivery time in Lebanon is from 2 to 5 working days
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      Product Details

      • Publisher: HarperTrophy
      • Publishing date: 08/07/1994
      • Language: English
      • ISBN-13: 9780064471053
      • ISBN: 0064471055

      Synopsis

      A prince fights for his crown

      Narnia ... where animals talk ... where trees walk ... where a battle is about to begin.

      A prince denied his rightful throne gathers an army in a desperate attempt to rid his land of a false king. But in the end, it is a battle of honor between two men alone that will decide the fate of an entire world.


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      • It's About Aslan
        From Amazon

        To say this is the worst of the series is rather to say how great the series is. This book is highly recommended, but the other six even more so. Prince Caspian is simply less engrossing as story. It is a book about bringing justice to the disenfranchised. It is perhaps the most character-driven of the Narnia books, which is probably why it would be difficult to make into a movie. And the primary character is of course Aslan.

        The book focuses on Aslan throughout, whether or not he is there. Indeed, the overarching theme is trusting in Aslan, whether or not you see him. Pervading all the scene is Aslan- discussions about him, discussions about how he doesn't exist, and a presence that can't be seen but some know is there. Character develops in response to the dilemma of the unseen Aslan.

        Aslan isn't the only character though. We are entertained by beautiful descriptions, like a bear who must put his foot into his mouth (suck his paws), or a giant who is always putting his foot into his mouth (metaphorically). Indeed, battle plans are drawn up precisely because of the characters of the different participants. And we are introduced to perhaps the finest character of the Narnia series- Reepicheep, the valiant Mouse.

        But while character-driven, Lewis seems to have taken a step back from writing good character in this novel. There are good insights into the nature of belief, but the characters don't quite ring true. And while it makes sense that Aslan would save the day, as after all, the novel is about him, we don't get enough of a connection between the presence of the Pevensies and the salvation of Narnia at the end of that day.

        Thus there are two excellent reasons to read this book. Dawn Treader doesn't make sense without it. And for the lessons on faith that are gently told through story, as only a story can.

      • weakest of a delightful and enchanting series, but worth the read
        From Amazon

        The Pevensie children are called back to Narnia in order to save it from the tyrannical rule of Prince Caspian's uncle, who has destroyed almost all of the magic and wilderness from Narnia. Aslan also joins the children. Peter, Susan, Lucy, and Edmund all return to their roles of Kings and Queens of Narnia. Not as clever and imaginative and exciting as the first book in the series, but still very magical and delightful. The enchanting and complex characters of Reepicheep (the brave mouse) and Trumpkin (the conflicted dwarf) definately make the journey worth it.

      • Dancing Trees
        From Amazon

        This is a great story. I didn't think so when last reading it over twenty-five years ago. Then I thought it weaker compared to the other Narnia stories. But now, being older, I can see the richness of this story and its imagery. It's about faith and leadership, about our longing for ruins to be renewed, and about the dangers of trying too hard to tame the wildness of nature. Most of all, I loved the scenes of Aslan and the Dancing Trees.

      • Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis (Paperback)
        From Amazon

        Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis was the last book I needed to complete my Chronicles of Narnia series. I was very happy with not only the condition of the book, but with the book itself. After I read the book, I went to see Prince Caspian, the movie. While the movie was great, the book was even better. It encompassed all the mythology and classic C.S. Lewis many have grown to love.

        Mary Anne

      • Read the book before you watch the movie
        From Amazon

        Prince Caspian is the second published installment of the Chronicles of Narnia series. It is a little darker than The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe but still definitely kid friendly. As I stated in my review of The Lion... Christian themes are woven throughout the book; however, I believe you can still thoroughly enjoy the book even if you are not a Christian.

        Prince Caspian picks up one year in earth time which is approximately 1,300 years in Narnia, after the great battle and victory portrayed at the end of the first book. This time Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy are summoned back to Narnia to help Prince Caspian, the rightful king to take his place. Aslan, which from a Christian theme, is portrayed as Jesus Christ does not play as visible of a role in this book as he does in the first. He finally makes a formal appearance about two thirds into the book

        C.S. Lewis' writing style lends itself to a quick and pleasurable read that can be enjoyed by young and old alike and I would highly recommend the first two books in the Narnia series and plan to continue to read through the rest.

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