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      Antoine Online

      Late Edition

      by Bob Greene
      Our price: LBP 38,985 / $ 25.99Unavailable
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      Product Details

      • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
      • Publishing date: 07/07/2009
      • Language: English
      • ISBN-13: 9780312375300
      • ISBN: 0312375301

      Synopsis

      A loving and laughter-filled trip back to a lost American time when the newspaper business was the happiest game in town.

      In a warm, affectionate true-life tale, New York Times bestselling author Bob Greene (When We Get to Surf City, Duty, Once Upon a Town) travels back to a place where?when little more than a boy?he had the grand good luck to find himself surrounded by a brotherhood and sisterhood of wayward misfits who, on the mezzanine of a Midwestern building, put out a daily newspaper that didn't even know it had already started to die.

      ?In some American cities,” Greene writes, ?famous journalists at mighty and world-renowned papers changed the course of history with their reporting.”  But at the Columbus Citizen-Journal, there was a willful rejection of grandeur?these were overworked reporters and snazzy sportswriters, nerve-frazzled editors and insult-spewing photographers, who found pure joy in the fact that, each morning, they awakened to realize: ?I get to go down to the paper again.”

      At least that is how it seemed in the eyes of the novice copyboy who saw romance in every grungy pastepot, a symphony in the song of every creaking typewriter.  With current-day developments in the American newspaper industry so grim and dreary, Late Edition is a Valentine to an era that was gleefully cocky and seemingly free from care, a wonderful story as bracing and welcome as the sound of a rolled-up paper thumping onto the front stoop just after dawn.

      Award-winning journalist Bob Greene is a CNN contributor and a New York Times bestselling author whose books include Duty: A Father, His Son, and the Man Who Won the War and Once Upon a Town: The Miracle of the North Platte Canteen.
      In Late Edition, Bob Greene travels back to a place where?when little more than a boy?he had the grand good luck to find himself surrounded by a brotherhood and sisterhood of wayward misfits who, on the mezzanine of a Midwestern building, put out a daily newspaper that didn’t even know it had already started to die. ?In some American cities,” Greene writes, ?famous journalists at mighty and world-renowned papers changed the course of history with their reporting.” But at the Columbus Citizen-Journal, there was a willful rejection of grandeur: these were overworked reporters and snazzy sportswriters, nerve-frazzled editors and insult-spewing photographers, who found pure joy in the fact that, each morning, they awakened to realize, ?I get to go down to the paper again.”

      At least that is how it seemed in the eyes of the novice copyboy who saw romance in every grungy pastepot, a symphony in the song of every creaking typewriter. With current-day developments in the American newspaper industry so grim and dreary, Late Edition is a Valentine to an era that was gleefully cocky and seemingly free from care, a story as bracing and welcoming as the sound of a rolled-up paper thumping onto the front stoop just after dawn.
      In Late Edition, Bob Greene travels back to a place where?when little more than a boy?he had the grand good luck to find himself surrounded by a brotherhood and sisterhood of wayward misfits who, on the mezzanine of a Midwestern building, put out a daily newspaper that didn’t even know it had already started to die. ?In some American cities,” Greene writes, ?famous journalists at mighty and world-renowned papers changed the course of history with their reporting.” But at the Columbus Citizen-Journal, there was a willful rejection of grandeur: these were overworked reporters and snazzy sportswriters, nerve-frazzled editors and insult-spewing photographers, who found pure joy in the fact that, each morning, they awakened to realize, ?I get to go down to the paper again.”

      At least that is how it seemed in the eyes of the novice copyboy who saw romance in every grungy pastepot, a symphony in the song of every creaking typewriter. With current-day developments in the American newspaper industry so grim and dreary, Late Edition is a Valentine to an era that was gleefully cocky and seemingly free from care, a story as bracing and welcoming as the sound of a rolled-up paper thumping onto the front stoop just after dawn.

      ?There is something absolutely magical about Bob Greene’s voice.”?Jeffrey Zaslow, co-author of The Last Lecture

      ?Bob Greene is a virtuoso of the things that bring journalism alive.”?Tom Wolfe

      "A valedictory hymn to the daily newspaper, composed by a lifelong journalist who began his career cranking carbon paper into newsroom typewriters and now blogs from his laptop. CNN contributor Greene, who has written for decades on American culture and politics, launched his career in the 1960s as a teen copyboy for the now-defunct Columbus Citizen-Journal. The author begins his account in the fall of 2008 aboard a CNN presidential-campaign bus rolling through Columbus and passing the building where his career had begun. Nostalgia grips him and does not let go for the duration of the book. Though never mawkish, the text follows the emotional coming-of-age story of a misfit who found a roomful of other misfits at the Citizen-Journal. Greene describes his various duties at the paper?summer jobs as copyboy, sportswriter and reporter?while he was in high school and college. He recalls the ecstasy of seeing his words in print for the first time?and, later, his first byline and his first page-one story. He cannot explain some of his early impulses?stepping out on the golf course to walk alongside Arnold Palmer during a tournament (Arnie chatted amiably, gave him a good story), writing and submitting copy without authorization?but it's his newshound instincts that he is trying to comprehend. Greene most eloquently describes the atmosphere at the Citizen-Journal?the sounds of clacking typewriters and clattering Linotype machines, the clutter and the coffee?and the colorful personalities of his colleagues. He writes of celebrities who drifted through Columbus?Ozzie and Harriet, Nelson Rockefeller?and muses about the incomprehensibility that anything would ever change. A fervent, entertaining journey back to a time when print media still mattered."?Kirkus Reviews

      "In a touching homage to the daily newspaper, Greene weaves a wistful tapestry of 'the sights, sounds, and smells' of his first job working at his hometown newspaper, the Columbus Citizen-Journal, from 1964 to 1968. He recalls the wonder of his first day as a copy boy and the subsequent years spent writing for the paper's sports and city desks. In his youth, argues Greene, when TV was just beginning to take hold, American families cherished their local newspapers as 'the daily scrapbook of a city's life.' People subscribed to the morning paper produced by one news organization and the evening edition of another in order to keep abreast of local business, school, civic, and sporting events. Greene also recollects when his 'first love,' the Citizen-Journal, printed its last edition in 1985, a time when cities could no longer sustain two competing newspapers. This nostalgic look at the importance of newspaper reporting in American life is valuable reading for anyone concerned about the possibility of having no newspapers to turn to for their local news."?Donna Marie Smith, Library Journal

      "Greene, a veteran Chicago columnist and author, offers a glowing tribute to the glory days of America's newspapers and the simpler society they so aptly reflected. Currently a CNN contributor, he remembers his days as a copyboy and other apprentice positions at the Columbus Citizen-Journal and the Columbus Dispatch, two rival newspapers in Ohio's capital city, with the noisy reporters, prying editors, artful pressmen and artisans in the composing room. Greene laments the passing of a proud tradition from the peak year of 1984 with 63.3 million circulation sliding to 50.7 million per day, noting its generational gap of 63.7% of daily readers being 55 years or older contrasted with 33% of readers ages 25-37. Refreshing, respectful and comical, Greene's press-time recollections are meant to be read slowly and savored as the current chaotic computerized information business replaces newsprint, banner headlines and night owl editions."?Publishers Weekly


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      • Days gone by - when people read.
        From Amazon

        What an incredible book! Mr. Greene has done a fantastic job at sharing his memories of working at an old school newspaper. From his starting at the Columbus, Ohio Citizen-Journal during its pinnacle days to being there at its final edition, the reader is treated to a total insider's look at the workings of journalism when the lead was hot as the type was set! This missive is much more than journalism however. Mr. Greene's recollections of downtown city life in the '60s when there were vibrant downtowns, paints vivid pictures of those simpler days. I grew up in the same town that this book is set and it evoked vivid memories of so many of the situations he recalls. I highly recommend this book as a detailed time capsule of life when newspapers were an important, intrinsic part of EVERY person's life. I look forward to re-reading it again shortly.

      • A Section B Read
        From Amazon

        I don't know whether to like Bob Greene or not. Unquestionably he is a great observer of human nature. If you read any of his books it is easy to become intrigued by the sensitivity and the depth he uncovers within the people he meets. On the other hand, he tends to occasionally drag me to boredom when he seems to just be filling pages. Late Edition is his latest example. You will find this tale to be a revealing story of his memories as a young student while working at the Columbus Citizen. He intersperses information about the newspaper business in general along the way. Unfortunately, much of it is presented as unnecessary and laborious. On the other hand, his remembrances of the people he met and the events in which he was involved is interesting and enchanting (how many people get chastised by Woody Hayes for the way they answer the phone?!). Even his description of the sports department and the area where he worked is creative and well-explained. On the other hand, all too often he leaves his life and seems to be responding to an editor's plea to add more copy. Greene became a favorite internationally by writing fascinating tales about people and their strange and unusual situations. He is at his best when examining people. He should stay true to his strengths.

      • RICK "SHAQ" GOLDSTEIN SAYS: "ONE MAN'S YOUTHFUL LOVE AFFAIR WITH A NEWSPAPER."
        From Amazon

        There have been inestimable love stories written about men and women... there have been fathomless love stories concerning date and time... but you'd be hard pressed to find such a poetic... romantic... infatuation... between a young man and a crumbling industrial industry such as the newspaper business. The author Bob Greene's reminisces regarding his youthful... loving abandon... to the written word... that was captured by individuals that the author places on mighty pedestals... with the exalted title of *REPORTER*... is akin to watching Romeo and Juliet perform with their clothes smudged with printers ink. As the reader progresses into the story it's as if you're being dragged in by the velvety glove of an otherwise ink stained type setter in a 1960's middle-America Newspaper office. It all starts when an eleventh-grade Columbus, Ohio student named Bob Greene who always dreamed of being a writer is in English Class and President John F. Kennedy is assassinated. The future author sat down and began to type: "THE CLASS SITS IN STUNNED SILENCE... NOT QUITE ABLE TO REALIZE THE FULL IMPACT OF THE SITUATION. A GIRL IS QUIETLY WEEPING AT HER SEAT...". After class... on his own he went downtown to an old building at 34 South Third Street... the home of the "COLUMBUS CITIZEN-JOURNAL" and the "COLUMBUS DISPATCH"... the place where the daily newspapers for his hometown were created each day. The author painstakingly recreates the bliss of daily life... that wouldn't be a complete day... without a family's daily newspaper. You couldn't start the day without the morning paper... and you couldn't finish the day without the evening paper. And inside this utopia is where young Bob's goals and aspirations dwelled. As he warmly recreates his begging for a chance... a job... an internship... hell... even just to be a "go-fer"... if that's what it took to get him inside this mystical newspaper business... that some might call a job... but to him it was his dream of dreams. He brought in his five-hundred-typed-words that described his view of the immediate effect of JFK's assassination in his Ohio classroom to the Citizen Journal. Being in that building was like what a trip to Disneyland for any other teenager would be. But Instead of magic carpet rides and Peter Pan... he saw reporters... copy editors... and typesetters. As the author cracked open the door to squeeze inside in an attempt to get a foothold towards his future... unbeknownst to him and the entire industry... the newspaper industry as we knew it... was already on a rapidly increasing downward spiral. There were hints and clues all around him... but in the midst of his passionate fascination with the written and reported word... he and the world were blind. "MY FATHER WOULD PUT DOWN THE "DISPATCH" EACH NIGHT A MINUTE BEFORE WALTER CRONKITE-BEFORE *THE NEWS* ARRIVED IN OUR HOME. HAD I BEEN SMARTER-HAD I BEEN PAYING PROPER ATTENTION-I MIGHT HAVE SENSED WHAT THIS SIGNIFIED." As the years passed computers replaced typesetters and proofers. On-line newspapers and bloggers were updated around the world with the clicking of a key... the morning paper "news-flashes" were already old news due to the web. Who would pay for a newspaper when it was free in your home without putting on your slippers to go outside. If you were in Tokyo and wanted a copy of the New York Times you didn't have to wait days for the mail... you simply clicked a key. In 1985 the "CITIZEN-JOURNAL" was no more. The author introduces his narrative from his current position in the inner-sanctum of an electronic-computerized-satellite-communication CNN Election Express bus... where each character he types shoots off into outer space and around the world in a micro-second... but each chapter of his story is dripping with his tears... from the oh-so-long-ago memories of a love that is no more.

      • A wonderful and provocative work
        From Amazon

        In "Late Edition," Bob Greene gives us yet another heartfelt journey through a world which, unfortunately, seems to be slowly winking out. Greene's keen eye and his honest emotion make this book both a triumph and a somewhat bittersweet tale. In the future, there will hopefully still be at least a few writers like Bob Greene and someone at a City Desk such as Sam Perdue who will say: "Nothing to write? There are PEOPLE out there!" Thank you, Bob Greene, for once again sharing your passion with us. I would recommend this book to anyone with a passion. Actually, I'd recommend it to anyone with a pulse.

      • Another great Bob Greene book!
        From Amazon

        I have read many of Bob Greene's books over the years, and LATE EDITION is one of the best. He writes in a way that is easy to understand and paints a beautiful picture. I look forward to his next book.

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