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      Antoine Online

      Nineteen eighty-four

      by George Orwell
      Our price: $28.00Unavailable
      *Estimated standard delivery time to Lebanon within 3 weeks
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      Product Details

      • Publisher: Harvill Secker
      • Publishing date: 11/08/2009
      • Language: English
      • ISBN-13: 9781846553288
      • ISBN: 1846553288

      Synopsis

      Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell's nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff's attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell's prescience of modern life--the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language--and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written.

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      • not good
        From Amazon

        Cannot say that I enjoyed reading this book, because I did not approve of a lot of the things the author included. However, I did find some of the main points interesting to create a story. But definitely not the type of good book to read, nor would I recommend it.

      • Meditation over Thought and Language
        From Amazon

        George Orwell in his essay "Politics and the English Language" makes explicit his belief that language and thought are intricately intertwined, and in his masterpiece "1984" he makes this even more explicit. The protagonist Winston Smith is almost 40 years old in the year 1984, making him as old as George Orwell's adopted son who was born in 1944. Under the Ingsoc (English socialism) system, Smith is an Outer Party cadre, but what he really is as a writer. He is neither a Alexander Solzhenitsyn nor a Noam Chomsky because there simply is no tolerance for any dissent whatsoever. He is trapped not physically but mentally, and every second of his life is like torture to him. As a writer he, like Orwell, believes that language permits thought which permits the self. What Ingsoc enforces is the negation of language (Newspeak) and the negation of thought (doublethink) which equals the negation of self. Newspeak is the reduction of language ino meaningless absurdity, and thus Newspeak is the ultimate bureaucratic language -- it eliminates all the nuances and subtleties of the language, making it only functional. Newspeak is the ultimate straitjacket for a writer. Doublethink is a mode of thinking that accepts contradictions, holding two opposing ideas to be both true. Doublethink negates logic, and thus higher order mental processing. More nefariously, it creates servility in most men, and duplicity in some: most individuals cannot comprehend two competing ideas at once, and thus doublethink negates them into no-think; those geniuses who are capable of holding contradictions in their head automatically become deceptive and manipulative -- in holding two competing truths the person becomes the only truth. In "1984" there are two individuals capable of doublethink: Winston Smith and the book's antagonist O'Brien. Smith refuses to submit to doublethink, and instead seeks the freedom to pursue truth. He writes in a diary, a blatant crime, and he addresses his writings to O'Brien, who Smith correctly suspects can understand him. They are doppelgangers of each other, and their difference is in their attitude towards doublethink. If Smith is doublethink's greatest critic, then O'Brien is doublethink's greatest practitioner. If Smith cannot stand to live another day under Ingsoc, O'Brien is in fact Ingsoc, Big Brother, and the Party, for he alone is the truth. If O'Brien wishes to be Big Brother's greatest enemy he is the truth, and if he wishes to be Big Brother himself he is still the truth. Ingsoc is a system of slow banal torture, whereby individuals must voluntarily (under the threat of torture) surrender their selves to Big Brother. They are not permitted to write, to think, and above all to be intimate: the greatest act of rebellion by Winston Smith and Julia was to make love and to love each other. It is not enough for Big Brother to demand your obedience -- he must also control your thoughts and your memories. O'Brien is clearly a psychopath, and Smith is his plaything; O'Brien does not fear and hate Smith -- he is just contemptuous. For seven years, O'Brien had been watching Smith ("Big Brother is watching you"), and when Smith carelessly and faithfully went to O'Brien with his subversive thoughts then O'Brien's only thought could be: he's always known. Smith orchestrated his own sacrifice, but it was not a martyrdom: it was in fact just an escape from his life. If a writer cannot write, then that is a fate worse than death.

      • Okay of a book not one of my favorites.
        From Amazon

        This is a good old Syfi book. but i would not suggest it to any child under 11 years of age. Has some positive elements in it and two words out of the foul language.

      • 1984
        From Amazon

        1984 is a book I first read in the 8th grade for my English class. I liked it then, and I love it today. 1984 is a book you have probably heard of, even if only in passing. And if you haven't heard of the book itself, you have definitely heard some of the concepts that appear in this book. Big Brother, thought crime, doublethink, newspeak. All these came from this book and have entered into the modern lexicon. The best part about this novel is that it provides us with a look at a very real and possible dystopian world. As we follow Winston through the society in which he lives, we get to see what happens when a government is allowed to rule society, and the picture is anything but gumdrops and smiles. One of the elements of this that always sticks with me is the way in which the government goes about controlling the people. Done through technology and the mystique of omnipresence, Big Brother controls his peoples' lives and the people are unaware that they are just rats in a maze. Of course, the primary reason I would recommend reading this book is because it forces you to take a closer look at the world around you. In this novel, George Orwell seems to have predicted some of the technologies we have today, and also seemed to foresee how society would use them. Seeing the world he described, and then seeing the world we live causes there reader of this book to take a step back and look at what's going on in the world today.

      • Great Purcahse
        From Amazon

        I am really satisfied with my purchase. Everything went great. I`ll recommend it to others.

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